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A study evaluated data from a Phase I/II trial of Piqray combined with an aromatase inhibitor to find mechanisms of resistance hindering clinical benefit from the therapy.

Anetumab ravtansine was well tolerated and there was "a positive trend" suggesting that high mesothelin expression may indicate which cancer patients benefit from BAY 94-9343.

Patients with luminal breast cancer subtypes may do just as well without anthracycline-based chemo and avoid unnecessary toxicities, a study showed.

Researchers showed that detectable ctDNA following chemoradiation may identify lung cancer patients who will likely have disease recurrence and should receive consolidation immunotherapy.

Overexpression of immunoproteasome components PSMB8 and PSMB9 were found to be predictive of improved survival and response to immunotherapy.

Researchers performed single-cell RNA sequencing and demonstrated that the emerging heterogeneity in SCLC necessitates optimal combination treatment strategies at the outset.  

Mutated KRAS protein has been notoriously difficult to target with drugs, but MD Anderson researchers are trying to get at KRAS mRNA using exosomes.

The Angiosarcoma Project uses patient-partnered research to gather information and glean new genomic insights into angiosarcomas.

The new center will bring together pathology, computer science, cancer genomics, and immunogenomics to study which cancer patients can benefit from immunotherapy.

Researchers have identified immune cell gene expression signatures that could one day be developed into tests to predict response to treatment.

Three new studies have found that the presence of B cells in tertiary lymphoid structures in tumors is associated with a favorable response to immunotherapy.

Using data from over 500 CAR cell clinical trials, researchers hope to improve patient-trial matching and future immunotherapy designs.

The organoids could be grown to contain cellular features of the original tissue samples, enabling them to better mimic what occurs in the body than two-dimensional cultures.

Researchers at BostonGene and Weill Cornell Medicine hope their approach may provide a more complete and precise characterization of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

Currently available under a soft launch, the tool can provide information about the prevalence of cancer risk mutations based on patients' demographics.

An analysis found a 14 percent prevalence of germline cancer risk mutations and a 57 percent prevalence of variants of unknown significance.

The researchers believe their findings could be used to change how patients' risk for breast cancer, colon cancer, or heart disease is calculated.

The classifier, called PurIST, can be applied to various pancreatic cancer sample types and different gene expression platforms, which may improve its clinical applicability.

The firm, a spin-out of Barts Cancer Institute, is developing a mass spec-based test for identifying AML patients likely to respond to the drug midostaurin.

Researchers found that about 12 percent to 15 percent of breast cancer patients carry multiple mutations in the gene, 95 percent of which are double mutations.

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