Close Menu

Color Genomics

Many companies and counselors see the COVID-19 pandemic as a catalyst for moving germline risk testing into a digital-first healthcare model.

The researchers believe their findings could be used to change how patients' risk for breast cancer, colon cancer, or heart disease is calculated.

Researchers found that 14 percent of individuals with metastatic breast cancer had risky mutations germline mutations, including patients who did not meet testing criteria.

Investigators used gene panel testing to assess hereditary breast and ovarian cancer risk in African American women with breast cancer, uncovering potential gaps in test access.

Color researchers reported that 21.7 percent of individuals with pathogenic variants in well-established genes did not meet guidelines for testing.

By profiling hereditary risk variants in women with breast cancer, researchers hope to lay the foundation for future genetic testing programs in the Caribbean country.

A NorthShore University HealthSystem and Color pilot picked up pathogenic variants in nearly 9 percent of unselected individuals with a hereditary cancer gene test.

By focusing too heavily on family history, the Preventive Services Task Force is missing many opportunities for prevention, patient advocates, industry players, and researchers say.  

Researchers led by MD Anderson’s Karen Lu want to know the most efficient genetic counseling strategy as more people are getting screened for cancer risk genes.