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From changes in trial enrollment to increased flexibility, clinical trials in precision oncology and other fields are feeling the brunt of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Researchers found that more than 3 percent of postmenopausal women with breast cancer but no other disease risk factors carried pathogenic variants. 

Researchers showed that detectable ctDNA following chemoradiation may identify lung cancer patients who will likely have disease recurrence and should receive consolidation immunotherapy.

Using data from cancer registries, investigators saw apparent disparities in the surgical interventions and treatments used for breast cancer patients with inherited cancer risk.

A new analysis has provided evidence that adjuvant lung cancer immunotherapy benefits those with lingering ctDNA, but not necessary those without.

Researchers developed a feature mapping algorithm to pair cancer patients with precision oncology trials at Stanford but say increased clinical trial standardization is needed.

By looking at genes and pathways with altered expression in tumor samples, researchers uncovered potential treatment targets beyond those provided by tumor DNA testing.

Whether they're analyzing checkpoint inhibitors, CAR T cells, or combination regimens, pediatric cancer researchers must carefully consider which targets and drugs to trial.

The grant recipients will receive up to $5 million each and are led by scientists at institutions including Harvard Medical School and the Cleveland Clinic.

Stanford University's Allison Kurian and her colleagues found that women with pathogenic variants were more likely to undergo a bilateral mastectomy.

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