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Precision Oncology Resources: Webinars

Mon
Jul
11
10:30 AM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Lumicks

Cell Avidity Measurements to Understand and Enhance CAR-T/Tumor Interactions

CAR-T therapy can be a highly effective treatment for certain blood cancers, but the mechanisms underlying productive CAR-T cell/tumor interactions are only beginning to be understood. Recent work has demonstrated that productive interactions can be influenced by the density of the target antigen on the tumor cell, stability of the CAR molecule itself, and additional antigen-independent and antigen-regulated interactions mediated by adhesion molecules. The sum of the T-cell interaction with an antigen-bearing target cell is known as avidity.

Recent technological advances have enabled various measurements of T-cell/tumor interactions, and Marcela Maus, director of cellular immunotherapy at Harvard Medical school, and colleagues have recently explored measurements of avidity in the CAR-T cell setting. In this webinar, Maus will discuss novel CARs and the use of avidity measurements to understand and enhance productive CAR-T cell interactions with both liquid and solid tumors.

Sponsored by

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Tue
Jul
12
10:00 AM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Oxford Nanopore Technologies

Tumoroids From Colon Cancer, Including WGS Strategy

The study of three-dimensional cell models, such as tumoroids, has great potential in translational clinical research. Indeed, the stabilization of patient-derived organoids (PDOs) is one of the tools of choice for cancer studies, due to their capacity to hold some characteristics of the tumors from which they are derived. In this webinar, Federica Di Maggio, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Naples Federico II, will discuss a study in which she and colleagues established 15 PDOs derived from subjects with colorectal cancer (CRC). The team observed the PDOs during the various phases of their growth with microscopy analyses. Furthermore, they verified the origin of the tumoroid cells by immunofluorescence analysis of cytokeratin-20. To better understand the mutation pattern of each stabilized PDO, the team carried out molecular analyses: first, using a customized multigene panel (n=58) and then using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) with Oxford Nanopore technology. These analyses were performed on four different genomes derived from the same subject (blood, PDOs, tumor-derived tissue, and locally paired healthy tissue). Using this strategy, they found 14 mutations in genes related to CRC predisposition in these individuals (in the blood sample genomes), and pathogenic mutations at the somatic level in the PDOs. Their findings demonstrate the potential of this strategy for a personalized precision medicine approach for each individual. Experiments are ongoing to extend this comparative analysis of sequences to the whole mutation spectrum in the framework of precision medicine studies, including library screening of colorectal anticancer drugs for specific mutations.

Sponsored by

Wed
Jul
13
1:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Thermo Fisher Scientific

Evidence and Application of Pharmacogenetic Testing to Drive Precision Medicine

Precision medicine holds the promise of leaving behind the one-size-fits-all approach to pharmacotherapy for more patient-personalized treatment plans that take into account lifestyle, behaviors, polypharmacy, and genetic profiles. An important part of this medication personalization is identifying pharmacogenes that can influence drug metabolism or side effect risk — pharmacogenetics (PGx). Daniel Dowd, senior Vice President of medical affairs at Genomind will review the agencies and scientific consortiums that support PGx testing, the clinical trials and economic evidence surrounding PGx, and the real-world application of PGx.

Sponsored by

Tue
Aug
02
1:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Vibrent

E-Consent in the Era of Digital Health, Genomics, and Wearables: What We Can Learn From the NIH’s All of Us Research Program

In the age of digital health, an effective approach to electronic informed consent, or e-consent, is the key to building trust with research participants so that they will agree to digital data collection and remain engaged for the duration of a study. This webinar will explore what researchers can learn from the National Institutes of Health’s All of Us Research Program’s e-consent success during participant recruitment, especially among underrepresented groups and health disparities populations. The All of Us Research Program has recruited more than 600,000 participants, but research studies of all sizes can achieve success by implementing some of the program’s strategies.

Gerard Moeller, professor of psychiatry and pharmacology and director of the Wright Center for Clinical and Translational Research at Virginia Commonwealth University, will explore his strategic approach to e-consent to gather electronic health record, genomics, surveys and wearable data to study the impact of COVID-19 in twins. Through the Mid-Atlantic Twin Registry, Moeller connects researchers with the largest twin registry in the United States.

Alan Shuldiner, professor of medicine and associate dean for personalized and genomic medicine at University of Maryland School of Medicine, will discuss his experience in several studies including the MyHealthy Maryland longitudinal research study focused on building a large cohort of 250,000 participants, a large percentage of which are underrepresented in clinical research, and his research involving the Amish community.  

All of Us successes include:

  • Implementing decentralized e-consent that meets regulatory requirements of 50 US states.
  • Developing an e-consent protocol that is flexible for those across the spectrum of digital literacy.
  • Creating interoperable data sets that include genomic, wearable, and EHR data.
  • Recruiting 80 percent of participants from groups that have historically been underrepresented in biomedical research.

Sponsored by

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Wed
Aug
24
1:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by NanoString

The Spatial Landscape of Progression and Immunoediting in Primary Melanoma at Single-Cell Resolution

Cutaneous melanoma is a highly immunogenic malignancy that is surgically curable at early stages but life-threatening when metastatic. In this webinar, Ajit Johnson Nirmal, a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard Medical School and Dana Farber Cancer Institute, will discuss the integration of high-plex imaging, 3D high-resolution microscopy, and spatially resolved microregion transcriptomics to study immune evasion and immunoediting in primary melanoma. Guided by classic histopathology, spatial profiling of proteins and mRNA reveals recurrent morphologic and molecular features of tumor evolution that involve localized paracrine cytokine signaling and direct cell-cell contact. Hallmarks of immunosuppression are already detectable in precursor regions. When tumors become locally invasive, a consolidated and spatially restricted suppressive environment forms along the tumor-stromal boundary.

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