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Precision Oncology Resources: Webinars

Chief Medical Officer, Basilea Pharmaceutica International

President and CEO, GeneCentric Therapeutics

This webinar, Part 3 of the “Advances in RNA-based Biomarker Development for Precision Oncology” webinar series sponsored by GeneCentric Therapeutics, will discuss novel and emerging applications of RNA-based genomic analysis in precision oncology, form characterizing the tumor microenvironment to informing the development of immuno-oncology treatments.

Marc Engelhardt of Basilea Pharmaceutica International will discuss work showing that differential induction of gene expression may explain differences in reported adverse event profiles of targeted anticancer agents. His talk will detail the analysis of gene expression induction in safety relevant normal tissues from patient-derived xenograft models as an approach to rationalize and identify the molecular basis of adverse event profiles of targeted anticancer agents.

Michael Milburn, President and CEO of GeneCentric, will follow with a discussion of the utility of bulk tumor RNA-seq analysis in drug development. In particular, he will cover aspects of specimen and study design for bulk tumor genomics, as well as advantages and challenges of RNA-based diagnostics over DNA variations.  Development of immunogenomic analyses and GeneCentric’s overall technology approach will be highlighted.  This includes looking beyond RNA transcriptomics and utilizing RNA sequence data in drug development.

Sponsored by

Lower Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Trials Lead,
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre

Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) can allow clinicians and researchers to better understand which patients are at high risk of recurrence and should be offered intensified chemotherapy or selected for clinical trials. Those with low-risk disease may be able to avoid chemotherapy and its associated side effects.

Methods for ctDNA detection require very high-sensitivity approaches in order to detect microscopic disease after surgery or treatment. Methods have been developed that utilize genomic profiling of tumor tissue based on patient-specific next-generation sequencing (NGS) panels. High-sensitivity personalized panels allow detection of residual disease and serial monitoring for detection of recurrence.

This webinar will discuss the use of such panels to test for residual disease and recurrence in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

Sponsored by

Professor of Molecular Oncological Pathology
University Medical Center Groningen

Staff Scientist, Scientific Affairs
Agena Bioscience

In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), early detection of emerging resistance mutations such as EGFR T790M is important in order to determine the appropriate targeted therapeutic strategy.

In this webinar, Prof. Ed Schuuring of University Medical Center Groningen will report on a comparison study for the detection of mutations in plasma DNA of NSCLC patients using the Roche Cobas EGFR v2.0 Mutation Test, BioRad droplet digital PCR, and the Agena Bioscience UltraSEEK Lung Panel. Prof. Schuuring will discuss the detection sensitivity of clinically relevant markers across the platforms and will also highlight the relevance of pre-analytical quality and quantity assessment of cfDNA.

Dr. Alexander Sartori from Agena Bioscience will follow with an overview of the MALDI-TOF based MassARRAY System and available mutation panels for both tissue and plasma DNA in various cancers.

Tue
Oct
27
11:00 am2020
Sponsored by
LGC SeraCare Life Sciences

The Promise of Liquid Biopsy for Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Monitoring: Are We There Yet?

Genome Webinar

Professor of Molecular Oncological Pathology,
University of Groningen

Consultant Clinical Scientist and Director,
Genomics Quality Assessment

Scientific Associate
Institute of Pathology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin

This webinar brings together an expert panel of stakeholders in cancer diagnostics and clinical care who will discuss the promise and challenges of liquid biopsy technologies in cancer diagnosis, monitoring, and patient care management.

The use of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) as a surrogate sample type for tumor tissue is an area of significant clinical interest. ctDNA has been demonstrated to mirror the solid tumor mutational landscape and has the potential for early diagnosis of cancer as well as monitoring and tracking biomarkers associated with residual disease over time.

Despite this promise, there are still open questions regarding the best way to implement liquid biopsy approaches in the clinical setting. Our panel brings together academic, clinical, and industry experts in liquid biopsy technologies who will describe the applications of this technique and discuss its benefits and shortcomings in the context of cancer care.

Sponsored by

Laboratory Director,
Xing Cancer Care

Illumina’s BaseSpace Sequence Hub (BSSH) supports primary and secondary analysis of massively parallel sequencing data and can be applied to gene panel data that is generated as part of a clinical cancer assay performed in a pathology lab.

In this webinar, Lynn Fink of Xing Cancer Care will discuss how her ISO15189-accredited lab has used BSSH to support informatics data analysis as part its routine testing and will share details of why the lab chose this platform over other options.

In particular, Lynn will share how the lab uses the BSSH-hosted DRAGEN (Dynamic Read Analysis for Genomics) apps — Enrichment, Germline, and Somatic — to perform in-depth coverage analyses of a 1,000 cancer gene panel, germline alteration calling, and tumor-normal paired somatic alteration calling, respectively. These apps support about 95 percent of the lab’s analytical needs.

Lead Scientist, Molecular Profiling, NEO New Oncology

Molecular tumor profiling has provided extensive value, both in tumor biology and oncology, with the development of new technologies to identify biomarkers. While conventional technologies, such as FISH and PCR, allow accurate low-throughput detection (e.g., EML4-ALK fusion), next-generation sequencing-based approaches enable comprehensive and simultaneous identification of various alterations (single nucleotide variants, insertions/deletions, fusions, copy number alterations) and genomic signatures (microsatellite instability, tumor mutational burden).

Compared to conventional technologies, NGS-based approaches overcome the challenge of limited materials and reduce the turnaround time. However, further improvements are still needed due to the complex structure of the genome, including repetitive regions and high GC/AT content.

In this webinar, Dr. Judith Müller-Eisert of NEO New Oncology will discuss a collaboration with Agilent Technologies to develop several hybrid capture-based assays for various tumor entities using the SureSelect XT HS2 chemistry. She will share details of the kit’s performance and discuss its use as a powerful tool for cancer profiling.

For Research Use Only. Not for use in diagnostic procedures.

Professor of Cancer Prevention,
Hutchison-MRC Research Centre, University of Cambridge

This webinar will provide an overview of novel proximal and distal sampling methods that have promise to improve patient outcomes from esophageal cancer.

Esophageal cancer is a global public health concern due to late presentation and poor patient outcomes. Esophageal adenocarcinoma has increased six-fold over the past 30 years in the UK, northwest Europe, Australia, and North America and it is generally preceded by a premalignant condition called Barrett’s esophagus.

In this webinar, Rebecca Fitzgerald of the Hutchison-MRC Research Center at the University of Cambridge, will discuss two non-endoscopic methods that show promise for improving patient care.

The first method relates to earlier diagnosis. Traditional diagnosis relies on endoscopy for those patients presenting with persistent heartburn unresponsive to medication, or alarm symptoms such as weight loss and dysphagia. Non-endoscopic methods that are affordable, acceptable, and easy to provide in the primary care setting could improve early detection. The Cytosponge-TFF3 test, combines a minimally invasive cell sampling device with immunohistochemical staining for the biomarker trefoil factor 3. The approach is a promising non-endoscopic method with substantial evidence to underpin its use, and Dr. Fitzgerald will present data from the recent randomized controlled trial BEST3.

For those patients diagnosed with invasive adenocarcinoma, earlier detection of relapse and indicators of response to therapy would help to tailor treatment. Blood biopsy to detect circulating tumor DNA is one such approach and Dr. Fitzgerald will present data to show the potential of a ctDNA mutation panel to detect relapse post-surgery in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma in a retrospective study.

Rachford and Carlota A. Harris Professor,
Department of Pathology, Stanford University

Most recent single-cell and spatial biology studies have focused on the network of interactions between different cell types and their spatial context. However, studying tumor biology at two different levels — the interacting cell types as well as the tissue regions within which they are organized — can give further insight into tumor progression and immunotherapy response.

Dr. Garry Nolan and his team at Stanford University collaborated with the University of Bern to conduct deep single-cell phenotyping and spatial analysis on a cohort of colorectal cancer formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples using the CODEX (CO-Detection by indEXing) platform from Akoya Biosciences. As a result, the authors discovered nine distinct cellular neighborhoods, each uniquely composed of certain immune and cancer cell types. These cellular neighborhoods were found to interact with one another in a manner that correlated with disease progression and prognosis.

In this webinar, Dr. Nolan will discuss the findings from the study and present an analytical framework to analyze high-dimensional imaging data that can reveal new insights into how the tumor microenvironment is organized.

Learning objectives:

  • How to use high-dimensional imaging to study tumor biology at the single-cell and tissue architecture levels
  • How spatial interactions between cellular aggregates in the tumor microenvironment contribute to disease progression and prognosis in colorectal cancer
Sponsored by