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Precision Oncology Resources: Webinars

Wed
Oct
05
11:00 AM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Vizgen

Investigation of Cellular and Molecular Pathways for Anti-Tumor Immune Response in Early-Stage Hepatocellular Carcinoma

In this webinar, Assaf Magen of the Precision Immunology Institute at Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine will review the recent neoadjuvant clinical trial of PD-1 blockade in early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, in which the team observed a 30 percent pathological response rate, prompting a detailed investigation into the cellular and molecular pathways that promote an effective anti-tumor immune response. Magen and team focused on T-cell-rich lesions (in contrast to T-cell-low or excluded tumors) because, despite no apparent defects in T-cell priming and recruitment to tumors, a large subset of T-cell-rich lesions still failed to respond to checkpoint blockade.

In this webinar, Magen will discuss:

  • How mregDC/T-helper niches enable local reactivation of CD8 T cells upon PD-1 blockade.
  • Correlations and mechanisms of response to ICB in early-stage HCC.
  • Single-cell molecular and spatial profiling of immune cells.
  • Mapping of cellular interactions.

Sponsored by

vizgen logo.jpg
Tue
Oct
11
12:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by 10x Genomics

Determinants of CAR T-Cell Clinical Response in Lymphoma and Glioma

Approximately 60 percent of patients with large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL) treated with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies targeting CD19 experience disease progression, and neurotoxicity remains a challenge. More generally, there are no effective CAR T-cell therapies for most patients with cancer, including those with all solid tumors.

In this webinar, Zinaida Good, PhD, post-doctoral scholar at Stanford University, will describe how multimodal single-cell analyses identified and validated a CD19-CAR-T cell subset with hallmark features of T regulatory (TReg) cells in blood early post-infusion, which is associated with clinical progression, less severe neurotoxicity, and diminished CAR T-cell expansion. These data implicate CAR TReg cells in limiting response and toxicity following CD19-CAR-T cell therapy for LBCL.

Good will also share how her team followed endogenous T-cell receptor (TCR) clones of CD19-CAR T cells at the single-cell level from pre-manufacture apheresis to the infusion product, tumor-involved lymph node, and blood in LBCL patients. The resulting CAR T-cell atlas enabled the team to ask questions like: “What were the phenotypes of the most successful CAR T-cell clones at the time of infusion or pre-manufacture apheresis?

Good will conclude with initial insights from pediatric patients with diffuse midline glioma (DMG) who received GD2-CAR T-cell therapy and exhibited marked improvement, exemplifying the promise of this therapy for DMG, a universally fatal cancer.

Sponsored by

Tue
Oct
18
1:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Personal Genome Diagnostics

Multiomic Analyses and Cancer Therapy Selection

The webinar is part one of a four part molecular tumor board series.

In this session, our expert panelists will review patient cases in which multiomic profiling has identified biomarkers that may or may not aid clinicians in making treatment decisions.

Precision oncology has seen a natural maturation from guiding therapy decisions based only on testing of specific, largely hotspot DNA mutations to testing that integrates assessment of sequence mutations, structural changes (i.e. deletions, amplifications, fusions), RNA, and protein levels. There are also genomic signatures, such as immune profiling gene expression signatures, tumor mutation burden (TMB), microsatellite instability (MSI), and homologous recombination deficiency (HRD) and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) status, that have further clinical implications in a pan-solid tumor setting.  

While these multiple layers of biomarker information have the potential to better inform individualized treatment plans and patient outcomes, they have also made it more difficult for oncologists to readily interpret test results and make clinical decisions. Our panel will discuss in detail several clinical cases where multiomic profiling was conducted and used to recommend a course of treatment for patients based on the available data.

The session will wrap up with a live Q&A in which attendees can discuss the cases with the Virtual Molecular Tumor Board panelists.

Sponsored by

Personal Genome Diagnostics
Tue
Nov
01
1:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Personal Genome Diagnostics

Therapeutic Case for Expanding Germline Cancer Risk Panels: Implications for HRD and Beyond

The webinar is part two of a four part molecular tumor board series.

The use of germline multi-gene hereditary cancer panels to identify patients at risk for heritable malignancies, such as breast and ovarian cancer, has been widely applied.  These panels primarily assess the genes involved in homologous recombination or those important for mismatch repair (Lynch syndrome). Recent studies have expanded the utility of hereditary cancer panels, with a significant risk found independent of type of solid tumor or presence of family history. This has important implications for counseling patients and their families around matters of cancer risk, screening, and early detection. The results of these panels also influence therapy selection for patients with cancer. 

More recently, the association between mismatch repair deficiency and response to immune checkpoint inhibitors (PD-1, PD-L1, CTLA-4) has broadened interest in Lynch syndrome assessment, while the approval of PARP inhibitors has driven demand for identifying patients with underlying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations or tumors with homologous recombination deficiency (HRD). New biomarkers for targeted therapy also have implications for hereditary cancer risk and increase the clinical complexity for most oncologists, as they try to keep abreast of guidelines, new indications for therapy, when to refer a patient for genetic counseling, and how to prioritize mismatch repair or HRD-associated therapy options with others revealed in the comprehensive genome profile.

Our panel will address these challenges within the context of specific clinical cases. The session will wrap up with a live Q&A in which attendees can discuss the cases with the Virtual Molecular Tumor Board panelists.

Sponsored by

Personal Genome Diagnostics
Tue
Nov
15
1:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Personal Genome Diagnostics

Impact of Structural Variants and Co-Occurring Variants on Cancer Therapy Prioritization

This webinar is part three of a four part molecular tumor board series.

In this session, our expert panelists will review patient cases in which genomic profiling has identified structural variants with possible clinical relevance,

Improvements in nucleic acid sequencing technology have made the routine detection of structural alterations such as gene fusions, amplifications, and genomic instability signatures possible. In particular, the clinical relevance of gene fusions has expanded, resulting in both FDA-approved and clinically supported treatment options. Additionally, the increased utilization of comprehensive genomic analyses has the potential to inform a broad range of co-occurring somatic and germline alterations that may be associated with hereditary disease, therapeutic selection, and primary- and acquired- resistance to treatments.

However, this technological progress has increased clinical challenges for oncologists, as they try to keep up with therapeutic opportunities and understand how to prioritize treatment options amid other biomarker-informed therapies that could also potentially benefit patients based on their comprehensive genomic profiling results.

Our panel will address these challenges and opportunities within the context of specific clinical cases. The session will wrap up with a live Q&A in which attendees can discuss the cases with the Virtual Molecular Tumor Board panelists.

Sponsored by

Personal Genome Diagnostics
Tue
Nov
29
1:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Personal Genome Diagnostics

Impact of Genomic Profiling on Risk Stratification and Treatment Selection in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

This webinar is part four of a four part molecular tumor board series.

In this session, our expert panelists will review patient cases in which genomic profiling has identified alterations that make patients eligible for targeted therapies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). 

For more than 40 years, the standard of care for AML was cytotoxic chemotherapy. However, since 2017, 10 new AML treatments have been approved by the FDA, promising to rapidly change the standard of care for AML. This shift has been due in large part to genomic profiling and the identification of oncogenic drivers for AML. 

FDA-approved therapies targeting common oncogenic drivers of AML are now available, including FLT3 and IDH1 in the newly diagnosed and relapsed/refractory settings and IDH2 therapies for relapsed/refractory disease. 

Targeted therapies in AML present unique challenges for oncologists related to the timing of molecular testing. For newly diagnosed patients, the window from diagnosis to treatment initiation is small, typically less than 7 days. This makes molecular workflows challenging to identify both mutations with front-line treatment implications and all mutations that may impact prognosis.   

Our panel will address these challenges within the context of specific clinical cases. The session will wrap up with a live Q&A in which attendees can discuss the cases with the Virtual Molecular Tumor Board panelists.

Sponsored by

Personal Genome Diagnostics