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Dr. Yaolin Zhou discusses Quality Improvement Model to Support Molecular Testing of Oncology Patients

Director of Molecular Pathology,
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (OUHSC)

This webinar will discuss how the Molecular Pathology Laboratory at the University of Oklahoma (OUMP) is using a new quality improvement model to support molecular testing of oncology patients. 

The oncology landscape is rapidly evolving due to new biomarker discoveries and targeted treatments. Biomarker testing is ideally performed in on-site molecular diagnostic laboratories to facilitate local communication and promote multidisciplinary collaboration.

However, assay implementation and incorporation is complex and full of potential pitfalls. Due to the costs and challenges associated with offering new molecular tests, labs need to take additional steps to ensure that the healthcare provided is effective, efficient, patient-centered, safe, and timely.

In this webinar, OUMP's Yaolin Zhou will discuss how her lab approaches molecular testing as a quality improvement initiative. She will present the EPIDEM model of quality improvement, which stands for Exploration, Promotion, Implementation, Documentation, Evaluation, and Modification.

Dr. Zhou will review specific applications of the EPIDEM model to improve molecular testing of leukemia, breast cancer, and melanoma patients and will also share OUMP’s approach to next generation sequencing using Qiagen's GeneReader NGS System.

Tue
Jul
30
11:00 am2019
Sponsored by
Mission Bio

Single-Cell Sequencing Reveals Clonal Heterogeneity in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Genome Webinar

Professor Genetics KU Leuven, Group Leader VIB, Leuven, Belgium

Postdoctoral Researcher, VIB-KU Leuven, Belgium

This webinar will outline a project that performs large-scale and integrative single-cell genome and transcriptome profiling of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases at diagnosis, during drug treatment, and in case of relapse.

ALL is the most common cancer in children and shows extensive genetic intra-tumoral heterogeneity. This heterogeneity may be the underlying reason for an incomplete response to treatment and for the development of relapse.

Data from this study provides information about the sensitivity of each leukemia clone to therapy and about how relapse can develop. Moreover, the results point toward the feasibility to detect minor clinically relevant leukemia clones at diagnosis or during early days of treatment in ALL.

The main focus of this webinar will be:

  • Introduction of the Tapestri Platform from Mission Bio for targeted single-cell DNA sequencing
  • Presentation of a novel custom panel covering the 300 most mutated genomic regions in ALL
  • Insights into the clonal architecture of pediatric T-ALL, lessons learned from the first 16 samples processed with this custom ALL panel
Sponsored by

Head, Division of Genetics Department of Lab Medicine and Pathology,
Saint John Regional Hospital

This webinar will provide a first-hand look at how a molecular laboratory validated and implemented a targeted next-generation sequencing-based myeloid assay to expedite the assessment of myeloid malignancies and assist in the understanding of myeloid cancers.

The most recent version of the World Health Organization classification system for myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia, published in 2016, added a number of important biomarkers and genetic alterations for the assessment of myeloid malignancies. As the list of relevant molecular markers continues to grow and new targeted therapies are approved, traditional, single-gene approaches for analyzing myeloid malignancies have become laborious and time consuming. Next-generation sequencing has emerged as the optimal solution by enabling comprehensive assessment of all relevant molecular markers in a single NGS run.

In this webinar, Dr. Nancy Carson, Head of the Division of Genetics at the Saint John Regional Hospital, will discuss her team’s experiences as one of the first labs in Canada to implement an NGS-based myeloid assay.

Dr. Carson will discuss:

  • Unique considerations and applications of NGS in myeloid malignancies
  • Overview of her experience with with analytical validation and implementation of the assay
  • Impact of the implementation of the assay to date through case studies
  • Future directions

Postdoctoral Researcher,
Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine 

In this webinar, Ngoc-Tung Tran, Postdoctoral Researcher at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, will provide a general introduction of the CRISPR/Cas9 system. He will summarize the current approaches to enhanced homology-directed repair for precise gene editing. Regarding gene therapy applications, he will point out the differences between precise gene editing by CRISPR/Cas9 and gene delivery by viruses. He will also discuss the potential limitations of CRISPR/Cas9 for clinical applications as well as the current status of solving these limitations.

The webinar will include an example of gene correction using CRISPR/Cas9 in his lab. Specifically, he will discuss ELANE mutation correction in patient-derived hematopoietic stem cells, and the potential of this approach as a potential gene therapy for severe congenital neutropenia.

Recent GenomeWebinars

Associate Director, Laboratory for Molecular Pediatric Pathology; Staff Pathologist, Boston Children's Hospital; Instructor of Pathology, Harvard Medical School

This webinar discusses background and clinical genomics of NTRK fusion detection in cancer. NTRK fusions are the focus of new therapeutic options, but clonal and subclonal lesions are notoriously difficult to detect. This webinar provides an overview and background about the increased role of these fusions, and latest trends in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment, as well as a research case study on detection.

Join Dr. Alanna Church of the Laboratory for Molecular Pediatric Pathology and Staff Pathologist at Boston Children's Hospital to learn more about the increasing role of NTRK fusions:

  •  Overview and background of fusion mutations, specifically NTRK 1, 2, and 3
  •  Frequency overview and specificity needed for detection
  •  Overview of research case of utilizing NGS technology in detection.

R&D Manager, ID-Solutions

VP of Commercial Operations, Stilla Technologies

This webinar will outline the entire liquid biopsy workflow from cell-free DNA isolation to mutation detection by Crystal Digital PCR with the Naica System from Stilla Technologies.

Our speakers will focus on detecting EGFR, BRAF, NRAS, and KRAS mutations as well as pediatric and adult cerebral tumor classification panels.

Attendees of this webinar will:

  • Understand the liquid biopsy process for EGFR, BRAF, NRAS, and KRAS mutations;
  • Learn about the benefits of the Crystal Digital PCR platform in combination with research-use-only kits;
  • Hear why digital PCR is a particularly useful technique for the detection of mutations, therapeutic monitoring, and resistance appearance;
  • Learn about the different steps of the liquid biopsy workflow, from DNA isolation to DNA quantification and qualification and DNA genotyping, with dPCR multiplex kits

Senior Specialist Biomedical Scientist, Frontier Pathology

Specialist Biomedical Scientist, Frontier Pathology

Specialist Biomedical Scientist, Frontier Pathology

This webinar will provide a first-hand look at how a hematology/oncology lab in the UK set up and validated three molecular assays for routine in-house use.

Speakers from the Royal Sussex County Hospital (RSCH) laboratory, operated under the Frontier Pathology NHS Partnership, will share their experience implementing two assays for suspected BCR-ABL1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms.

The RSCH lab has spent the last several years repatriating historical send-away hemato-oncology assays for JAK2 V617F and CALR exon 9. During this webinar, RSCH scientists Munyoro Guvamatanga, Anna Tarasewicz, and Rebecca Lough will share their experiences bringing these assays in-house.

The JAK2 V617F mutation assay was the first to be repatriated in 2015 and is performed using the CE-IVD marked ipsogen JAK2 RGQ PCR kit. More recently, the lab began detecting CALR exon 9 mutations using the CE-IVD marked ipsogen CALR RGQ PCR kit. The assays are performed using gDNA extracted from whole blood samples and subsequent real-time qPCR on the QIAGEN Rotor Gene Q MDx 5Plex HRM platform.

This webinar will describe the experiences and challenges associated with the setup and validation/verification of the assays in the RSCH laboratory.

Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering, Yale University

Director, New Collaborations, Isoplexis

This webinar discusses cutting-edge single-cell approaches to discover biomarkers that could elucidate the mechanism of a variety of autoimmune disorders as well as autoimmune and inflammatory reactions to immunotherapies.  

Many therapeutics seek to address a large growing need in autoimmune and central nervous system diseases. Additionally, despite their success in addressing major challenges in refractory blood cancers, current immunotherapeutic strategies are still hampered by autoimmune-like reactions and neurotoxicity-related events. Inflammatory responses from T-cells, monocytes, and other immune cells can have detrimental effects on patients in each of these areas, but it is challenging to understand the functional profile of these immune cells, and thus how to use this type of information to predict progression of autoimmune-like responses.

Our speaker, Dr. Rong Fan of Yale University, discusses IsoPlexis’ advanced immune-based approaches in systemic lupus erythematosus and adverse events like cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity in cell therapy. He describes the uses of single-cell functional proteomics in determining correlates and drivers of these adverse reactions, and how these biomarkers may be used in the future to improve therapeutic development and intervention.

In addition, Jon Chen of IsoPlexis shares a case study showing that monocyte polyfunction in multiple sclerosis tracks differential responses to treatments for early diagnosis and early intervention.

This webinar will be pre-recorded. You may submit questions in advance via the registration page.

Medical Oncologist, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center

Director of the Institute of Laboratory Medicine, German Heart Center of the Technical University

This webinar presents recent evidence that demonstrates how incorporating circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) assessments into real-world patient management can influence patient care decisions, alter radiographic interpretations, and impact clinical outcomes.

In particular, this webinar discusses OncoBEAM a ctDNA testing method based on BEAMing (Beads, Emulsion, Amplification, Magnetics) technology developed at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. OncoBEAM provides highly sensitive mutation analysis for the accurate and reliable detection of rare tumor-derived DNA present in the blood of patients with cancer.

In this webinar, Dr. Evan Lipson of Johns Hopkins shares his experience on the clinical utility of ctDNA measurements as an adjunct to radiographic imaging for monitoring disease activity in advanced melanoma patients undergoing treatment with targeted therapy or immune checkpoint inhibitors. These results have important implications for the clinical management of patients receiving immunotherapy and demonstrate the value of performing ctDNA testing for better resolution of tumor activity when performed alongside routine imaging and clinical assessments.

Next, Dr. Stefan Holdenrieder of the Technical University of Munich examines the value of KRAS-mutant ctDNA as a highly specific marker for early response prediction and treatment monitoring of advanced pancreatic cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. The discussion focuses on the potential clinical benefit of monitoring changes in ctDNA levels in response to therapy, which appear more pronounced and rapid than changes in established protein biomarkers.