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Precision Oncology Resources: Webinars

Wed
Jun
16
11:00 AM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Biognosys

Precision Oncology in Melanoma Patients Treated with Immunotherapy: Clinical and Technological Perspective

This webinar, the second in our Next-Generation Proteomics for Precision Oncology series, will discuss how unbiased discovery proteomics can be used to identify new key mechanisms and signatures supporting clinical decision-making for melanoma patients.

Immune checkpoint inhibitors have proven to be an effective weapon against many solid tumors, but a large proportion of patients do not show a clinical benefit upon treatment. While studies have identified genomic or transcriptomic features responsible to some extent for the lack of response, major advancements in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have only recently enabled comprehensive functional analysis of the final gene products on an unprecedented scale, enabling quantitative and clinically relevant analysis of response mechanisms.

In this webinar, Paolo A. Ascierto, MD of Italy’s National Tumor Institute and Kamil Sklodowski of Biognosys will elaborate on the promise of proteomics for addressing the unmet medical needs of melanoma patients undergoing immunotherapy. 

They will discuss data from a joint project in which cancer tissue samples from late-stage melanoma patients prior to treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors were analyzed using the Biognosys HRM discovery platform. 

They will share the clinical outcomes as well as the associated proteomic profiles of more than 8,500 identified and quantified proteins, providing a full picture of the capabilities of next-generation proteomics.

About The Series: Next-Generation Proteomics for Precision Oncology

This webinar series will highlight recent advancements in the proteomics field and the impact of proteomics on clinical research in oncology.

Sponsored by

Fri
Jun
18
12:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Canexia Health

Disparities in Precision Oncology: Identifying Barriers and Moving Toward Solutions

Last year, by Precision Oncology News' count, the FDA approved 27 precision oncology drugs, a 35 percent increase in the number of approvals from 2019. Although more and more biomarker-informed therapies are being developed and launched on the market, not all patients have access to them due to numerous barriers, among them difficulties accessing genetic testing, limited physician expertise, challenges setting up clinical trials in the community, and reimbursement pressures. Patients' social determinants of health also continue to influence whether they receive, or are even offered, biomarker testing and downstream treatment options. In this panel, experts in the community treating underserved populations and tracking access challenges will discuss the difficulties they are seeing and the solutions they're working on to improve equity in precision oncology.

Our panel of experts will be Kellie Jack, Community Outreach and Engagement Program Manager at Weill Cornell Medicine; Raymond Osarogiagbon, MD, Director of the Multidisciplinary Thoracic Oncology Program at Baptist Cancer Center; Rachit Kumar, MD, Director of Clinical Research, Medical Oncology at Maine General Medical Center; and Gregory Tranah, PhD, Executive Director of Precision Medicine at Sutter Health.
 

Sponsored by

Wed
Jun
23
12:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Invitae

Expanded Biomarker Research in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using RNA Next-Generation Sequencing

The discovery of targetable oncogenic biomarkers in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has revolutionized its treatment. Current guidelines recommend fast and comprehensive biomarker screening for the selection of first-line targeted therapy or immunotherapy with or without chemotherapy. The number of actionable targets and the requirement for extensive molecular screening strategies are expected to increase in the coming years. This webinar will summarize how NSCLC biomarker testing can be expanded by RNA next-generation sequencing. In this webinar you will learn:

  • The nature of clinical NSCLC biomarker testing in Europe
  • A clinician’s perspective on why the clinical environment should drive the focus of research testing
  • How Invitae’s expanded lung in-house panel* is well positioned to drive successful research testing

*Current products are for research use only, not for use in diagnostic procedures.

Sponsored by

Wed
Jun
23
2:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Ionpath

Predicting Cancer Progression – Development of Spatial Proteomic Signatures

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a pre-invasive lesion that is thought to be a precursor to invasive breast cancer (IBC). DCIS comprises approximately 20% of newly diagnosed breast cancer cases, and unlike IBC is not life-threatening. However, if left untreated, up to half of DCIS patients will develop IBC within 10 years, so clinical management has trended towards presuming all patients are progressors and treating them with surgery, radiation therapy, and pharmacological interventions. Thus, understanding the central biological features in DCIS that drive the transition to IBC is a critical unmet need for guiding appropriate patient care.

In this webinar, Dr. Michael Angelo will discuss research his lab conducted to understand how the tumor microenvironment (TME) changes with transition to IBC. Angelo and colleagues used Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging (MIBI) and a 37-plex antibody staining panel to analyze over 100 clinically annotated surgical resections covering the full spectrum of breast cancer progression. The team compared normal, DCIS, and IBC tissues using machine learning tools for multiplexed cell segmentation, pixel-based clustering, and object morphometrics. They found the transition from DCIS to IBC to progress by coordinated shifts in location and function of myoepithelium, fibroblasts, and infiltrating immune cells in the surrounding stroma. This study offers insight into the etiologies of DCIS and its transition to IBC—emphasizing the importance of the TME stroma—and may serve as a template for how to carry out similar analyses of preinvasive cancers using MIBI spatial proteomic signatures.

Sponsored by

Tue
Jun
29
12:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Agilent

Non-Coding RNA Analysis in Cancer: A Valuable Tool for Translational and Personalized Medicine

MicroRNAs are small, noncoding structures of about 19-25 nucleotides involved in the regulation of key cellular processes and cell communication. Their role in tumor tissue, the tumor microenvironment, and exosomes make them interesting candidates for therapeutic approaches in cancer.

MicroRNAs from both tissues and liquid biopsies are extensively studied as valuable biomarkers for early disease recognition, progression, and prognosis. MicroRNAs can also induce resistance or sensitization to specific cancer drugs. Evaluation of microRNAs using Agilent microarray technology will contribute to a better understanding of personalized cancer biogenesis, evolution, diagnosis, and treatment.

In this webinar, Dr. Cornelia Braicu and Dr. Ioana Berindan-Neagoe of Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy will discuss:

  • The pros, cons, and utility of different approaches that can support the exploitation of miRNAs as cancer biomarkers
  • The utility of microarray technology for microRNA evaluation in personalized medicine
  • Understanding and generating microRNA networks, plus examples

Sponsored by

Wed
Jun
30
11:00 AM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Stilla

Liquid Biopsy Detection of EGFR Mutations in NSCLC Patients Before and After Osimertinib Therapy

Liquid biopsy is a useful tool for longitudinal monitoring of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, but requires highly sensitive and reliable technologies for accurate detection of genomic alterations.

In this webinar, Evi Lianidou of the University of Athens will discuss a study that evaluated digital PCR (dPCR) for detecting EGFR mutations in plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and corresponding circulating tumor cell (CTC)-derived genomic DNA (gDNA).

The study used Stilla’s Crystal Digital PCR in a group of EGFR-mutant NSCLC patients under osimertinib therapy at two time points: before treatment initiation and at progression of disease.

Dr. Lianidou will share how Crystal Digital PCR allowed her team to track tumor evolution through the detection of low-abundance mutations in cfDNA and CTCs predictive for treatment outcomes of NSCLC patients under osimertinib.

Dr. Lianidou will also discuss other highlights of the study, including:

  • Crystal Digital PCR exhibited high concordance rates in correlation with Roche’s FDA-cleared Cobas technology;
  • In some cases, Crystal Digital PCR was more sensitive than other methods in detecting the T790M mutation, which is the key resistance mutation found during treatment with first-line and second-line EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors;
  • The presence of EGFR mutations in paired CTC-derived gDNA revealed discrepancies between CTCs and tumor or cfDNA genotyping.

Sponsored by

Wed
Jul
14
12:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by LGC SeraCare Life Sciences

Genomic Testing to Support New Therapies for Advanced Cancer Patient Care: A Panel Discussion

Molecular profiling of tumors has expanded the treatment options for patients with a wide variety of high prevalence cancers and cancers associated with high death rates, such as lung, colon, prostate, and breast. Overall, combining genetic testing with targeted therapies is extending survival while minimizing adverse effects. This webinar will bring together leading experts in molecular pathology, NGS tumor profiling, companion diagnostics development, and precision oncology for a panel discussion. The panelists will discuss topics including today’s achievements advancing precision diagnostics and how to address the many unmet laboratory and testing needs required to support continuous improvement of cancer patient therapy.  

The panelists on this webinar are Dara L. Aisner, MD PhD, Associate Professor, Director Colorado Molecular Correlates Laboratory, Department of Pathology at the University of Colorado, George Green, PhD, Executive Director, Head Pharmacodiagnostics at Bristol-Myers Squibb, Greg Tsongalis, PhD, Director of the Laboratory for Clinical Genomics and Advanced Technologies at Theodor Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and Russell Garlick, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer at LGC Clinical Diagnostics.

Sponsored by

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Tue
Jul
20
11:00 AM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Thermo Fisher Scientific

Advances in Immune Repertoire Sequencing for the Study of Lymphoid Neoplasms

In recent years, B- and T-cell repertoire analysis by next-generation sequencing (NGS) has shown distinct advantages over traditional methods for clonality detection in the study of lymphoid disorders. NGS delivers sequence-level resolution that yields very high specificity coupled with an extremely low limit of the detection (LOD) of 1 in 1,000,000 (10-6) cells. In addition, NGS provides a simpler path to standardization compared to flow-based methods and eliminates the need for allele-specific primers required by qPCR-based methods.

In this webinar Dr. John DeCoteau of the University of Saskatchewan Advanced Diagnostics Research Laboratory will share insight on the value of immune repertoire sequencing in hematological oncology research applications including clonality profiling, measurable residual disease (MRD) research, and somatic hypermutation frequency determination. He will present his experience utilizing NGS in heme-oncology research including recent data using the Ion Torrent Oncomine BCR Pan-Clonality Assay for clonality detection in a cohort of multiple myeloma samples. This novel assay includes primers targeting multiple B-cell receptor (BCR) chain rearrangements (IGH, IGK, IGL, KDE/Cint), enabling high positive clonality determination rates. He will describe how the workflow and flexible sample batching can enhance laboratory efficiency and will provide his perspective on the future of this application in routine use.

Sponsored by

Wed
Jul
21
12:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Qiagen

The Importance of FGFR as a Biomarker in Bladder Cancer

Certain FGFR alterations are key drivers of tumor growth in urothelial cancer, which is the sixth most common type of cancer in the US and is associated with poor prognosis. Erdafitinib has been approved for the treatment of urothelial carcinoma patients whose tumors harbor specific FGFR mutations or fusions. QIAGEN’s therascreen FGFR RGQ RT-PCR Kit was developed and FDA-approved as a companion diagnostic to identify such FGFR alterations.

In this discussion, expert panelists will examine the biological relevance and clinical significance of FGFRalterations and how FGFR testing can be leveraged to identify eligible patients.

Speakers include:

Dr. Arlene O. Siefker-Radtke, MDProfessor, Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Anjen Chenn, MD, PhDDiscipline Director, Molecular Oncology Labcorp

Dr. Neal D. Shore, MD, FACS Director, CPI Carolina Urologic Research Center

Sponsored by

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Thu
Jul
29
1:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Arbor Biosciences

From Discovery to Rapid Validation: A Two-Stage Platform for Analysis of Cell-Free DNA Methylation in Cancer

The liquid biopsy potential of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) has gained increasing interest and attention for screening, diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring in the spectrum of human malignancies. Recent studies show that epigenetic markers can be more clinically informative than other quantitative cfDNA detection methods.

The most common epigenetic DNA modification in humans is the alteration of the methylation status of cytosines. Measuring aberrant DNA methylation in cfDNA has many advantages over other molecular alterations such as point mutations or serum/plasma-based protein markers. DNA methylation changes occur early in tumorigenesis and are highly chemically stable. Moreover, typical methods of DNA methylation sequencing characterize many genome regions simultaneously, offering better limits of detection than standard assays. These aberrant methylation states rarely occur in normal cells, making them relatively easy to detect, even in the presence of a high background of normal cells. Finally, large-scale DNA methylation alterations are tissue- and cancer type-specific and therefore offer the potential not just to detect but also to classify cancers in patients with early-stage disease.

In this webinar, Dr. Bodour Salhia will describe a cfDNA methylation biomarker discovery and validation pipeline that can be broadly applied in designing assays for the detection of early and residual cancer. In addition to a unique analysis approach, the technique couples traditional whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) with highly accurate hybridization capture-based targeted sequencing which rapidly characterizes disease-associated methylation states in cfDNA. 

Sponsored by

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